Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by Cora Crary

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Jobs

Events

Arlington Mural is an Outlet for At-Risk Teens; News Roundup

by Cecilia Bianco

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • REDEEM Act Aims to Fix Criminal Justice System (StopTheDrugWar.org)
    “The REDEEM Act will ensure that our tax dollars are being used in smarter, more productive ways. It will also establish much-needed sensible reforms that keep kids out of the adult correctional system, protect their privacy so a youthful mistake can remain a youthful mistake, and help make it less likely that low-level adult offenders re-offend,” said Sens. Cory Booker.

  • L.A. Schools Program Aims to Keep Kids out of Courts (JIE)
    The nation’s second-largest school district — Los Angeles Unified — is unveiled a sweeping new agreement to curb police involvement in minor school discipline and campus problems.

  • D.C. Defense Attorneys Want Juveniles Released From Shackles in Court (The Washington Post)
    “They have been shackling kids who have no violent past. It’s a horrible thing. A lot of these kids are nonviolent offenders. We don’t want to send them down the wrong path by shackling somebody who doesn’t need to be shackled,” D.C. Council member David Grosso said.

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Study Illustrates Impact of Collaborative Support for Teens with Mental Health Issues

by Susan Richardson

holdinghands“Nearly two-thirds of adolescents who have had a major depressive episode don’t get treatment, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.”

A new study, Collaborative Care for Adolescents With Depression in Primary Care, examined the impact of a concerted treatment effort among parents and a depression care manager. NPR reports on the study:

“In a clinical trial, researchers from the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital split a group of 100 teens who screened positive for depression into two categories. Half were referred to mental health specialists and had their screening results mailed to their parents.

The rest were treated with what doctors call a collaborative care model. These kids were paired with a depression care manager (a specially trained nurse, social worker or therapist) who worked with them and their parents to choose a therapist and make decisions about whether a psychiatric medication might help. The care manager also followed up with the teens every week or two, and called their parents every month.

After a year, only 27 percent of the teens who didn’t get that extra coaching had enlisted in the recommended treatment, while 86 percent of the collaborative care group got treatment.”

The study not only explores the general lack of long-term support for teens with depression, it reiterates the need for collaborative parental, medical and community involvement in mental health treatment. That’s our goal at Reclaiming Futures. Providing a strong united support system to kids with mental health issues can prevent substance abuse and crime, helping kids avoid the juvenile justice system altogether.

Compassionate Canine Joins Snohomish County’s Juvenile Drug Treatment Court

by Janelle Sgrignoli

Lucy and Judge Dingledy

Meet Lucy.

Lucy is one of two highly trained therapy dogs in the Prosecuting Attorney’s office. Lucy has several important roles.

She provides support and comfort to victims of trauma and abuse. Lucy helps break the ice when children are asked to talk about sexual and/or physical abuse. She is in the courtroom, hidden from jurors, sitting with children as they testify in court. Some families also request that Lucy sit with them as they watch the trials of people accused of killing their loved ones.

Lucy and  Juvenile Drug Court staff

Lucy is also the newest member of Snohomish County’s juvenile drug treatment court. She and her handler, Kathy Murray, attend staffing and are also present in the courtroom. Lucy lies near the bench on her blanket.  She provides support for the youth while in the courtroom.

She also helps the team. It’s tough on the team members when a youth has not succeeded in breaking free from their addiction.  Having Lucy there helps ease frustration and sadness and keeps the team focused on helping every youth in drug court have the best chance of success.

Kathy, Lucy’s handler, is also developing a program that will allow drug court youth who like animals to earn community service credit by working with Lucy one on one. As part of the program Kathy will provide a short training session to teach youth about giving commands and proper grooming. Not only will this teach the youth proper handling techniques, having Lucy follow their commands  will also provide them with a sense of accomplishment.

We’re very fortunate in Snohomish County to have a Prosecuting Attorney that cares so passionately about victims of trauma, their families and our drug courts.

We are also grateful to Canine Companions for Independence, a private non-profit organization that breeds and trains dogs, primarily for people with disabilities, for providing Lucy.

 

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by Cora Crary

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Jobs

Former Incarcerated Youth Speaks Out: “Why Your Worst Deeds Don’t Define You”

by Cecilia Bianco

tedrfpostBy 19, Shaka Senghor had been shot three times and killed a man. After going through his darkest times in prison, leading to solitary confinement, Senghor had an awakening that led him to where he is today. In a March TEDTalk: Why Your Worst Deeds Don’t Define You, Senghor shared his powerful story of incarceration, rehabilitation and transformation.

After receiving a meaningful letter from his son, Senghor started to truly examine his past and the decisions he had made. This began his transformation, and these four key things kept his recovery moving forward:

  1. His mentors, who forced him to look at his life honestly and challenged his decision-making.
  2. Literature: While in prison, Senghor was inspired by many black poets, authors and philosophers whose words helped him heal. Senghor references the autobiography of Malcolm X as significant in shattering the stereotypes he believed about himself.
  3. Family: Senghor knew he couldn’t truly heal without his father by his side, and he thanks the mother of his children for teaching him how to love himself.
  4. Writing opened Senghor’s mind to the idea of atonement and helped him start to forgive himself. It also ignited a spark to share his reflections to help other incarcerated men and women begin to heal.

Senghor believes that rehabilitation is the most important element missing from the juvenile justice system, as not everyone has the support system around them that he did. He claims that it is our responsibility to change the tide to ultimately improve our society as a whole:

“The majority of men and women who are incarcerated are redeemable. Ninety percent of [incarcerated men and women] will return to the community, and we have a role in determining what kind of men and women return to the community.”

The ‘lock them up and throw away the key’ mentality, as Senghor calls it, is the main mindset he claims needs to change. Instead, he calls for society to embrace a more empathetic approach to allow more incarcerated youths and adults redeem themselves from past deeds and not be “held hostage to their past.” He believes each person needs the support to do three things that will begin recovery:

“Raise the Age” Victory in New Hampshire: More Kids Treated as Kids; News Roundup

by LJ Hernandez

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • Why Evidence-Based? New Resource Hub Covers All  (Reclaiming Futures)
    Moving toward the next step in determining reliable practices that reduce youth crime, the National Juvenile Justice Network and the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange launched a new Evidence-Based Practices section of the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub.
  • “Raise the Age” Victory in New Hampshire: More Kids Treated as Kids (Campaign for Youth Justice) 
    Are 17 year olds really old enough to be sent to adult prisons? In NH, since 1995, the answer has been YES. Over the past decade, as states across the US have recognized that 17 year olds are still children, NH was unwilling to change. Since 2000, Representative David Bickford (R ) attempted to “Raise the Age” without much support, that is until this year.

 

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health

Why Evidence-Based? New Resource Hub Covers All

by Susan Richardson

NatalieMoving toward the next step in determining reliable practices that reduce youth crime, the National Juvenile Justice Network and the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange launched a new Evidence-Based Practices section of the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub. This news hub will no doubt become a toolkit for policy makers as evidence-based programs and models become more prevalent.

Why is evidence-based important?

Beyond the fact that evidence-based practices are scientifically evaluated and proven to be effective in reducing crime, they also carry long-term benefits that directly affect communities. According to the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange, distinct benefits include:

  • Improving public safety
  • Improved outcomes for youth and families
  • Saving money
  • Technical assistance
  • Community support

The new evidence-based resource offers information on key issues, reform trends, experts in the field and resources. As Reclaiming Futures implements evidence-based screening, assessment and treatment, we’re happy to see this new resource become widely available.

Read more and share this new valuable resource here.

Take our Reader Survey: Share your Thoughts and Enter to Win

by Donna Wiench

During my first year with Reclaiming Futures, I’ve enjoyed meeting the good-hearted, solution-oriented, practical yet hopeful people who make up the Reclaiming Futures community, offline and online.

Some of you are connected to Reclaiming Futures’ 39 sites in 18 states; others are interested in bringing Reclaiming Futures to your communities.  (If this is you, I’d like to talk with you, so please contact me by email at donna.wiench@pdx.edu).

What we talk about on our website and blog reflects our learnings from both the courts and the academic research world, and is intended to be informative, inspiring, and useful to you.  To ensure that we’re delivering valuable, relevant information, we thought we’d just ask for your opinion of our content.

That’s why we’re launching an online survey this month, designed to gather your thoughts about your engagement with Reclaiming Futures, and what you’d like to learn more about.

We are also offering an incentive to participants. If you complete the survey and provide your name and contact information, you’ll be entered into a drawing for a $50 Amazon card.   

We respect your time, so the survey is short.  Nine questions are all we have to learn about what you’re interested in reading.   Are you willing to lend a hand?  Please click here.

Thank you for your help and for working to Reclaim the Futures of our young people.

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by LJ Hernandez

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Events

Jobs